mandopony:

rubyandhergingercat:

stupih:

my hero

This is a better Superman movie than the entirety of Man of Steel. 

I want this to be a whole movie.

weloveshortvideos:

Random crow shows up on dude’s porch, looks him straight in the face and says ‘fuck you’

My spirit animal. :’)

supertrainstationh:

Remember when people were complaining that the new Smash Bros. had “too many female characters” and that Nintendo was “pandering to feminists” by flooding the roster with females?

Nintendo does need some more female characters, preferably as MAIN (read: playable) characters. 
I do have to point out though that this chart isn’t entirely correct. R.O.B. is not male. It is a genderless robot. The name “R.O.B.” is just a shortening of its full name into an acronym — its full name being Robotic Operating Buddy. 
As for Duck Hunt, they are technically two characters, and it’s never specified what gender either of the two characters are (or even their personal names) as far as I can tell through my quick research. People assume the dog is male due to sexist undertones in depictions of cartoon characters throughout the ages (i.e. “it doesn’t have long eyelashes or a bow, so it must be male” or “it’s muscular so it must be male” type of thinking; in other words, it has no gender-defining characteristics, so it’s assumed male by default — a line of thinking we should be trying to avoid these days). Both the dog and the duck could be any gender as far as I’m concerned.
Regardless, neither of those things change the fact that there is a dearth of female playable characters in Nintendo games. They should work on that. A whole new IP with a female protagonist would be a good start. :)
supertrainstationh:

Remember when people were complaining that the new Smash Bros. had “too many female characters” and that Nintendo was “pandering to feminists” by flooding the roster with females?

Nintendo does need some more female characters, preferably as MAIN (read: playable) characters. 
I do have to point out though that this chart isn’t entirely correct. R.O.B. is not male. It is a genderless robot. The name “R.O.B.” is just a shortening of its full name into an acronym — its full name being Robotic Operating Buddy. 
As for Duck Hunt, they are technically two characters, and it’s never specified what gender either of the two characters are (or even their personal names) as far as I can tell through my quick research. People assume the dog is male due to sexist undertones in depictions of cartoon characters throughout the ages (i.e. “it doesn’t have long eyelashes or a bow, so it must be male” or “it’s muscular so it must be male” type of thinking; in other words, it has no gender-defining characteristics, so it’s assumed male by default — a line of thinking we should be trying to avoid these days). Both the dog and the duck could be any gender as far as I’m concerned.
Regardless, neither of those things change the fact that there is a dearth of female playable characters in Nintendo games. They should work on that. A whole new IP with a female protagonist would be a good start. :)

supertrainstationh:

Remember when people were complaining that the new Smash Bros. had “too many female characters” and that Nintendo was “pandering to feminists” by flooding the roster with females?

Nintendo does need some more female characters, preferably as MAIN (read: playable) characters.

I do have to point out though that this chart isn’t entirely correct. R.O.B. is not male. It is a genderless robot. The name “R.O.B.” is just a shortening of its full name into an acronym — its full name being Robotic Operating Buddy.

As for Duck Hunt, they are technically two characters, and it’s never specified what gender either of the two characters are (or even their personal names) as far as I can tell through my quick research. People assume the dog is male due to sexist undertones in depictions of cartoon characters throughout the ages (i.e. “it doesn’t have long eyelashes or a bow, so it must be male” or “it’s muscular so it must be male” type of thinking; in other words, it has no gender-defining characteristics, so it’s assumed male by default — a line of thinking we should be trying to avoid these days). Both the dog and the duck could be any gender as far as I’m concerned.

Regardless, neither of those things change the fact that there is a dearth of female playable characters in Nintendo games. They should work on that. A whole new IP with a female protagonist would be a good start. :)

pepsimangb:

oldgamemags:

Electronic Gaming Monthly #76, November 95 - Virtual Boy has gamers seeing red!
Follow oldgamemags on Tumblr for more awesome scans from yesteryear!

"I believe in UFOs—when we find them we’ll use their technology for gaming systems and one thing is for sure: Their technology will be better and cheaper than $179."

Hahaha! It’s kind of true, actually, since 2014 dollars aren’t worth as much as 1995 dollars. In fact, $179 in 1995 had the same buying power as $279 today according to the CPI Inflation Calculator: http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl?cost1=179&year1=1995&year2=2014
The UFO thing is bollocks though (so far). :P
pepsimangb:

oldgamemags:

Electronic Gaming Monthly #76, November 95 - Virtual Boy has gamers seeing red!
Follow oldgamemags on Tumblr for more awesome scans from yesteryear!

"I believe in UFOs—when we find them we’ll use their technology for gaming systems and one thing is for sure: Their technology will be better and cheaper than $179."

Hahaha! It’s kind of true, actually, since 2014 dollars aren’t worth as much as 1995 dollars. In fact, $179 in 1995 had the same buying power as $279 today according to the CPI Inflation Calculator: http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl?cost1=179&year1=1995&year2=2014
The UFO thing is bollocks though (so far). :P

pepsimangb:

oldgamemags:

Electronic Gaming Monthly #76, November 95 - Virtual Boy has gamers seeing red!

Follow oldgamemags on Tumblr for more awesome scans from yesteryear!

"I believe in UFOs—when we find them we’ll use their technology for gaming systems and one thing is for sure: Their technology will be better and cheaper than $179."

Hahaha! It’s kind of true, actually, since 2014 dollars aren’t worth as much as 1995 dollars. In fact, $179 in 1995 had the same buying power as $279 today according to the CPI Inflation Calculator: http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl?cost1=179&year1=1995&year2=2014

The UFO thing is bollocks though (so far). :P

lwamfhmartiboxdotty9:

You can fly to individual routes in ORAS. It’s about time.

sunfl0werpetal:

natnovna:

"obama is fuckin up"

true 

"should have voted for the other guy"

FALSE 

how about "the government is fucking up and obama is nothing more but a figure head to take the heat of all the congress’s dumbass decisions" The president isnt a dictator. he doesnt get to choose 100000000% by himself what happens to this country, hence the term democracy.

Um, actually, America is a republic, not a democracy. Please refer to the Pledge of Allegiance.

susemoji:

where do these white dads come from

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.
The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.
The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.
As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.
My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.
I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.
These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.
Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.
The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.
You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls
gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.
The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.
The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.
As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.
My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.
I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.
These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.
Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.
The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.
You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

A message from Anonymous
Moeeeee~ You should record yourself saying "moe moe kyun"~

http://vocaroo.com/i/s1pPcoBaiyfl

artxmits:

some halloweenie IhsiA late night doodlin

artxmits:

some halloweenie IhsiA 
late night doodlin